lookatthisstory
pbsthisdayinhistory:


 June 6, 1944: D-Day 
68 years ago today, Allied troops stormed the beaches of Normandy, France. Over 160,000 Allied troops and 30,000 vehicles landed along a 50-mile stretch of fortified French coastline and begin fighting on the beaches of Normandy.
Read a few letters written by American soldiers in Europe after D-Day.
Photo: National ArchivesGeneral Dwight D. Eisenhower gives the order of the day: “full victory - nothing else” to paratroopers in England, just before they board their airplanes to participate in the first assault in the invasion of the continent of Europe.

pbsthisdayinhistory:

June 6, 1944: D-Day

68 years ago today, Allied troops stormed the beaches of Normandy, France. Over 160,000 Allied troops and 30,000 vehicles landed along a 50-mile stretch of fortified French coastline and begin fighting on the beaches of Normandy.

Read a few letters written by American soldiers in Europe after D-Day.

Photo: National Archives
General Dwight D. Eisenhower gives the order of the day: “full victory - nothing else” to paratroopers in England, just before they board their airplanes to participate in the first assault in the invasion of the continent of Europe.

fdr-fala
fdr-fala:

Listening To His Master’s Voice

On Sept. 23, 1944, during a speech to the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of America, President Franklin D. Roosevelt addressed a recent political attack against his dog, Fala. He defended his dog’s honor by saying: 

“These Republican leaders have not been content with attacks on me, or my wife, or on my sons. No, not content with that, they now include my little dog, Fala. Well, of course, I don’t resent attacks, and my family doesn’t resent attacks, but Fala does resent them. You know, Fala is Scotch, and being a Scottie, as soon as he learned that the Republican fiction writers in Congress and out had concocted a story that I had left him behind on the Aleutian Islands and had sent a destroyer back to find him — at a cost to the taxpayers of two or three, or eight or twenty million dollars — his Scotch soul was furious. He has not been the same dog since. I am accustomed to hearing malicious falsehoods about myself — such as that old, worm-eaten chestnut that I have represented myself as indispensable. But I think I have a right to resent, to object to libelous statements about my dog.” (PBS)

See also: My Little Dog, Fala

fdr-fala:

Listening To His Master’s Voice

On Sept. 23, 1944, during a speech to the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of America, President Franklin D. Roosevelt addressed a recent political attack against his dog, Fala. He defended his dog’s honor by saying: 

“These Republican leaders have not been content with attacks on me, or my wife, or on my sons. No, not content with that, they now include my little dog, Fala. Well, of course, I don’t resent attacks, and my family doesn’t resent attacks, but Fala does resent them. You know, Fala is Scotch, and being a Scottie, as soon as he learned that the Republican fiction writers in Congress and out had concocted a story that I had left him behind on the Aleutian Islands and had sent a destroyer back to find him — at a cost to the taxpayers of two or three, or eight or twenty million dollars — his Scotch soul was furious. He has not been the same dog since. I am accustomed to hearing malicious falsehoods about myself — such as that old, worm-eaten chestnut that I have represented myself as indispensable. But I think I have a right to resent, to object to libelous statements about my dog.” (PBS)

See also: My Little Dog, Fala

While waiting on the deck of his troop transport ship to load into a landing craft on the morning of D-Day Sergeant George Kobe, of Roanoke’s Company D, 116th Infantry, passed this dollar bill around gathering signatures from as many of his comrades as possible. At least six of the men who wrote their names (some are illegible) were killed later that day. Virginia National Guard Historical Collection

While waiting on the deck of his troop transport ship to load into a landing craft on the morning of D-Day Sergeant George Kobe, of Roanoke’s Company D, 116th Infantry, passed this dollar bill around gathering signatures from as many of his comrades as possible. At least six of the men who wrote their names (some are illegible) were killed later that day. Virginia National Guard Historical Collection