Zapruder’s Camera
November 22, 196312:25 p.m.As tens of thousands of people greeted President Kennedy in downtown Dallas, Abraham Zapruder filmed two of his employees waiting near a grassy knoll just a block from Jennifer Juniors, Zapruder’s clothing company. Receptionist Marilyn Sitzman waved to the camera as payroll clerk Beatrice Hester sat with her husband, Charles, on a nearby bench. “Mr. Z” then climbed atop a concrete abutment and waited. Sitzman supported him in case Zapruder became dizzy. He stood 65 feet from the center of Elm Street.12:30 p.m.Zapruder filmed the Kennedy limousine after it turned onto Elm Street and captured the entire assassination—the only photographer to do so. He used a Bell & Howell Model 414PD Zoomatic Director Series camera with a Varamat 9-27mm f1.8 zoom lens, set for full close-up. Its 8mm Kodachrome II color film moved through the camera at an average speed of 18.3 frames per second, as determined by later tests.Zapruder continued filmed after the shooting, which took less than 10 seconds. He and Sitzman jumped down and walked into the shelter of a nearby pergola as the Hesters crouched on the grass. Zapruder and Sitzman soon became separated.
Read More from the Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza.
Photo: National Archives

Zapruder’s Camera

November 22, 1963

12:25 p.m.
As tens of thousands of people greeted President Kennedy in downtown Dallas, Abraham Zapruder filmed two of his employees waiting near a grassy knoll just a block from Jennifer Juniors, Zapruder’s clothing company. Receptionist Marilyn Sitzman waved to the camera as payroll clerk Beatrice Hester sat with her husband, Charles, on a nearby bench. “Mr. Z” then climbed atop a concrete abutment and waited. Sitzman supported him in case Zapruder became dizzy. He stood 65 feet from the center of Elm Street.

12:30 p.m.
Zapruder filmed the Kennedy limousine after it turned onto Elm Street and captured the entire assassination—the only photographer to do so. He used a Bell & Howell Model 414PD Zoomatic Director Series camera with a Varamat 9-27mm f1.8 zoom lens, set for full close-up. Its 8mm Kodachrome II color film moved through the camera at an average speed of 18.3 frames per second, as determined by later tests.

Zapruder continued filmed after the shooting, which took less than 10 seconds. He and Sitzman jumped down and walked into the shelter of a nearby pergola as the Hesters crouched on the grass. Zapruder and Sitzman soon became separated.

Read More from the Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza.

Photo: National Archives

House of Silence
The Film Guild Cinema was designed by architect Frederick Kiesler in 1928. Keisler was more than an architect, among other things he was a theater designer, artist, and a theoretician. Located on the main street of Greenwich Village in New York City, the Film Guild Cinema seemed to react with the very pulse of the city’s momentum. Kieslers’ intention with this theater was to create a ‘house of silence.’ The theater was conceived with a specific type of film spectatorship in mind. Careful acoustical aspects and spatiovisual considerations were taken into the design intentions of this theater. Among one of the most defining characterics of this theater was the controlling of the screen.

 
Kiesler’s screen could change with respect to the size of the image being projected. An expanding and constricting “irus” could be controlled to adapt to the geometry of the film being displayed. This device was called the “screen-o-scope” and resembled that of the aperture of a camera. According to the design specifications the screen could contrict down to a one-inch square, as well as become enlarged enough to reveal full sized screens. This design choice accomodated a variety of mediums ranging between that of 35 and 16mm presentations. —JPEG JEDI

House of Silence

The Film Guild Cinema was designed by architect Frederick Kiesler in 1928. Keisler was more than an architect, among other things he was a theater designer, artist, and a theoretician. Located on the main street of Greenwich Village in New York City, the Film Guild Cinema seemed to react with the very pulse of the city’s momentum. Kieslers’ intention with this theater was to create a ‘house of silence.’ The theater was conceived with a specific type of film spectatorship in mind. Careful acoustical aspects and spatiovisual considerations were taken into the design intentions of this theater. Among one of the most defining characterics of this theater was the controlling of the screen.

Kiesler’s screen could change with respect to the size of the image being projected. An expanding and constricting “irus” could be controlled to adapt to the geometry of the film being displayed. This device was called the “screen-o-scope” and resembled that of the aperture of a camera. According to the design specifications the screen could contrict down to a one-inch square, as well as become enlarged enough to reveal full sized screens. This design choice accomodated a variety of mediums ranging between that of 35 and 16mm presentations. —JPEG JEDI