cheatsheet
newsweek:

Forty-two years ago today, the successful execution of mission Apollo 11 allowed humans access to the Earth’s moon for the very first time. American astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin explored the lunar wonderland, erecting the flag of the United States on its rocky surface. That week, Newsweek ran with the above cover—a grainy shot of mankind’s first steps on the moon. Here’s how our editors at the time summed up the moment: 

“The feat of Apollo 11 was, in fact, the culmination of centuries of painstakingly acquired knowledge; the realization of dreams and myths as old as man’s consciousness itself; a magnificent opportunity to look deeply into the origins of the moon, the earth, and perhaps the universe; an exciting portent of the future. But most of all, it was a demonstration of what man’s ingenuity and courage and will can achieve when mobilized to a grand design.”

[Newsweek; July 28, 1969]

newsweek:

Forty-two years ago today, the successful execution of mission Apollo 11 allowed humans access to the Earth’s moon for the very first time. American astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin explored the lunar wonderland, erecting the flag of the United States on its rocky surface. That week, Newsweek ran with the above cover—a grainy shot of mankind’s first steps on the moon. Here’s how our editors at the time summed up the moment: 

“The feat of Apollo 11 was, in fact, the culmination of centuries of painstakingly acquired knowledge; the realization of dreams and myths as old as man’s consciousness itself; a magnificent opportunity to look deeply into the origins of the moon, the earth, and perhaps the universe; an exciting portent of the future. But most of all, it was a demonstration of what man’s ingenuity and courage and will can achieve when mobilized to a grand design.”

[Newsweek; July 28, 1969]

Frank Sinatra Has a Cold
"Frank Sinatra Has a Cold," ran in April 1966 and became one of the most celebrated magazine stories ever published, a pioneering example of what came to be called New Journalism — a work of rigorously faithful fact enlivened with the kind of vivid storytelling that had previously been reserved for fiction.
The two blondes, who seemed to be in their middle thirties, were preened and polished, their matured bodies softly molded within tight dark suits. They sat, legs crossed, perched on the high bar stools. They listened to the music. Then one of them pulled out a Kent and Sinatra quickly placed his gold lighter under it and she held his hand, looked at his fingers: they were nubby and raw, and the pinkies protruded, being so stiff from arthritis that he could barely bend them. He was, as usual, immaculately dressed. He wore an oxford-grey suit with a vest, a suit conservatively cut on the outside but trimmed with flamboyant silk within; his shoes, British, seemed to be shined even on the bottom of the soles. He also wore, as everybody seemed to know, a remarkably convincing black hairpiece, one of sixty that he owns, most of them under the care of an inconspicuous little grey-haired lady who, holding his hair in a tiny satchel, follows him around whenever he performs. She earns $400 a week. The most distinguishing thing about Sinatra’s face are his eyes, clear blue and alert, eyes that within seconds can go cold with anger, or glow with affection, or, as now, reflect a vague detachment that keeps his friends silent and distant. (Esquire)
Cover photo: Wikipedia

Frank Sinatra Has a Cold

"Frank Sinatra Has a Cold," ran in April 1966 and became one of the most celebrated magazine stories ever published, a pioneering example of what came to be called New Journalism — a work of rigorously faithful fact enlivened with the kind of vivid storytelling that had previously been reserved for fiction.

The two blondes, who seemed to be in their middle thirties, were preened and polished, their matured bodies softly molded within tight dark suits. They sat, legs crossed, perched on the high bar stools. They listened to the music. Then one of them pulled out a Kent and Sinatra quickly placed his gold lighter under it and she held his hand, looked at his fingers: they were nubby and raw, and the pinkies protruded, being so stiff from arthritis that he could barely bend them. He was, as usual, immaculately dressed. He wore an oxford-grey suit with a vest, a suit conservatively cut on the outside but trimmed with flamboyant silk within; his shoes, British, seemed to be shined even on the bottom of the soles. He also wore, as everybody seemed to know, a remarkably convincing black hairpiece, one of sixty that he owns, most of them under the care of an inconspicuous little grey-haired lady who, holding his hair in a tiny satchel, follows him around whenever he performs. She earns $400 a week. The most distinguishing thing about Sinatra’s face are his eyes, clear blue and alert, eyes that within seconds can go cold with anger, or glow with affection, or, as now, reflect a vague detachment that keeps his friends silent and distant. (Esquire)

Cover photo: Wikipedia

nwkarchivist
Been there, done that
nwkarchivist:

Apollo 7 launched on this day, 1968

“Why should the U.S. have a space program? John Kennedy provided one answer when he suggested that great nations are constantly renewed when they undertake great endeavors. The truth is, that even in this age of science, man needs symbols and still puts up shrines to express his aspirations.”    

Newsweek October 14, 1968

Been there, done that

nwkarchivist:

Apollo 7 launched on this day, 1968

“Why should the U.S. have a space program? John Kennedy provided one answer when he suggested that great nations are constantly renewed when they undertake great endeavors. The truth is, that even in this age of science, man needs symbols and still puts up shrines to express his aspirations.”    

Newsweek October 14, 1968

markcoatney
markcoatney:

todaysdocument:

First Issue of “Mad Magazine”, 10/1952

Happy birthday, Harvey Kurtzman and Mad Magazine! In October 1952, the very first issue of a new comic called “Mad” was issued, written almost entirely by Kurtzman. It soon came under Senate investigation (thus entering the records of the National Archives), which led to the comic book being transformed into the magazine still going strong today. One of these early issues of Mad is on display in the Archives’ permanent exhibit, The Public Vaults, in Washington, DC.

(via National Archives Foundation on Facebook)

How cool is your magazine when it prompts a Senate investigation?

markcoatney:

todaysdocument:

First Issue of “Mad Magazine”, 10/1952

Happy birthday, Harvey Kurtzman and Mad Magazine! In October 1952, the very first issue of a new comic called “Mad” was issued, written almost entirely by Kurtzman. It soon came under Senate investigation (thus entering the records of the National Archives), which led to the comic book being transformed into the magazine still going strong today. 

One of these early issues of Mad is on display in the Archives’ permanent exhibit, The Public Vaults, in Washington, DC.

(via National Archives Foundation on Facebook)

How cool is your magazine when it prompts a Senate investigation?