Re-Tracing The Steps Of A Civil War Photographer
Today’s 150th anniversary of the Battle of Antietam got us thinking: What if Civil War photographer Alexander Gardner could revisit some of the original sites he photographed? If he used his equipment today, what would the images look like? That is: How have the landscapes changed — or stayed the same? (NPR)
Same Camera, Different Century: Capturing Civil War Sites, 150 Years Later
Photo: The area around the white brick Dunker Church was a scene of heavy fighting. Men had been carried from the places where they fell, in preparation for burial. (Todd Harrington and Library of Congress)

Re-Tracing The Steps Of A Civil War Photographer

Today’s 150th anniversary of the Battle of Antietam got us thinking: What if Civil War photographer Alexander Gardner could revisit some of the original sites he photographed? If he used his equipment today, what would the images look like? That is: How have the landscapes changed — or stayed the same? (NPR)

Same Camera, Different Century: Capturing Civil War Sites, 150 Years Later

Photo: The area around the white brick Dunker Church was a scene of heavy fighting. Men had been carried from the places where they fell, in preparation for burial. (Todd Harrington and Library of Congress)

Pigeons, In Living Color
The humble grey pigeon. Many would volunteer it as the most detested of urban wildlife, second only perhaps to sewer rats and cockroaches (unsurprisingly, they’ve often earned the title “rats of the sky”). At best we regard them as a nuisance, at worst we’ll run them over in our vehicles with brusque disinterest. The carcasses on Commercial Street are proof enough.
Cheerily subverting our long-held notions of pigeon unpleasantries are Swiss artist Julian Charrière and German photographer Julius von Bismark, who revived their ongoing project Some Pigeons are More Equal That Others for this year’s Venice Biennale. First exhibited in Copenhagen, the artists use an airbrushing tool to dye the feathers of the pigeon in a multitude of florid colours. The painted pigeons are then released in Venice’s bustling St. Marks Square, where they mingle amongst their more modest brethren as a sort of live performance piece. (NewStatesman)
Julian Charrière: some pigeons are more equal than others
h/t: Marketplace

Pigeons, In Living Color

The humble grey pigeon. Many would volunteer it as the most detested of urban wildlife, second only perhaps to sewer rats and cockroaches (unsurprisingly, they’ve often earned the title “rats of the sky”). At best we regard them as a nuisance, at worst we’ll run them over in our vehicles with brusque disinterest. The carcasses on Commercial Street are proof enough.

Cheerily subverting our long-held notions of pigeon unpleasantries are Swiss artist Julian Charrière and German photographer Julius von Bismark, who revived their ongoing project Some Pigeons are More Equal That Others for this year’s Venice Biennale. First exhibited in Copenhagen, the artists use an airbrushing tool to dye the feathers of the pigeon in a multitude of florid colours. The painted pigeons are then released in Venice’s bustling St. Marks Square, where they mingle amongst their more modest brethren as a sort of live performance piece. (NewStatesman)

Julian Charrière: some pigeons are more equal than others

h/t: Marketplace

Why the Mars Curiosity Rover’s Cameras Are Lame by Today’s Standards
Ever since NASA’s Curiosity rover landed on Mars and started beaming back photographs earlier this week, people have been wondering, “why are the photos so bad?” The criticism seems merited: consumers these days are snapping great high-res photographs using phones that cost just hundreds of dollars, yet NASA can’t choose a camera with more than 2-megapixels of resolution for their $2.5 billion mission?
In an interview with dpreview, project manager Mike Ravine of Malin Space Science Systems — the company that provided three of the rover’s main cameras — explains that there were a couple main reasons behind the “lame” cameras: data transfer and fixed specifications. (PetaPixel)

Why the Mars Curiosity Rover’s Cameras Are Lame by Today’s Standards

Ever since NASA’s Curiosity rover landed on Mars and started beaming back photographs earlier this week, people have been wondering, “why are the photos so bad?” The criticism seems merited: consumers these days are snapping great high-res photographs using phones that cost just hundreds of dollars, yet NASA can’t choose a camera with more than 2-megapixels of resolution for their $2.5 billion mission?

In an interview with dpreview, project manager Mike Ravine of Malin Space Science Systems — the company that provided three of the rover’s main cameras — explains that there were a couple main reasons behind the “lame” cameras: data transfer and fixed specifications. (PetaPixel)

South Pole Street View
"Back in September 2010, we launched the first Street View imagery of the Antarctic, enabling people from more habitable lands to see penguins in Antarctica for the first time. Today we’re bringing you additional panoramic imagery of historic Antarctic locations that you can view from the comfort of your homes. We’ll be posting this special collection to our World Wonders site, where you can learn more about the history of South Pole exploration.” (Google Official Blog)
Google Photo: The ceremonial South Pole

South Pole Street View

"Back in September 2010, we launched the first Street View imagery of the Antarctic, enabling people from more habitable lands to see penguins in Antarctica for the first time. Today we’re bringing you additional panoramic imagery of historic Antarctic locations that you can view from the comfort of your homes. We’ll be posting this special collection to our World Wonders site, where you can learn more about the history of South Pole exploration.” (Google Official Blog)

Google Photo: The ceremonial South Pole

A Civil War In The Olive Garden Parking Lot
Through Robert Lee Hodge, a “re-enactor, battle site preservationist and walking encyclopedia of all things Civil War,” photographer Gregg Segal met his cast of characters and, over the course of five trips to the South and Gettysburg, created this series of, for instance, soldiers camped out in front of Domino’s. (NPR’s The Picture Show)

A Civil War In The Olive Garden Parking Lot

Through Robert Lee Hodge, a “re-enactor, battle site preservationist and walking encyclopedia of all things Civil War,” photographer Gregg Segal met his cast of characters and, over the course of five trips to the South and Gettysburg, created this series of, for instance, soldiers camped out in front of Domino’s. (NPR’s The Picture Show)

artphotocollector
artphotocollector:

Ann George is a new and inspiring photographer.  More information about her unique work can be found on NevaresFineArt.com  
From her statement: “I use photography as more than a means to capture a moment in time, but as a voice to capture a movement through time.  I seek to describe a journey, a fairytale, a feeling of progression to—and through—themes that engage my artistic eye.  Such are the images you see in The Three Chapters Of Illumination: God Calling. This series, created during a difficult period of uncertainty and loss, represents a metaphorical journey in three stages: one of burden, to knowledge, and into liberty—with the wolf symbolizing fear, and the young woman overcoming this fear.

artphotocollector:

Ann George is a new and inspiring photographer.  More information about her unique work can be found on NevaresFineArt.com 

From her statement: “I use photography as more than a means to capture a moment in time, but as a voice to capture a movement through time.  I seek to describe a journey, a fairytale, a feeling of progression to—and through—themes that engage my artistic eye.  Such are the images you see in The Three Chapters Of Illumination: God Calling. This series, created during a difficult period of uncertainty and loss, represents a metaphorical journey in three stages: one of burden, to knowledge, and into liberty—with the wolf symbolizing fear, and the young woman overcoming this fear.

Shedding Light On The Moon
In 1962, Mercury astronaut John Glenn bought a cheap 35mm camera at a Cocoa Beach, Fla., drug store, because he alone thought America’s first orbital spaceflight deserved to be documented with still images. Photographer Michael Light shares this bit of information in his project Full Moon. Over time, Light explains, NASA recognized the value of in-flight photography and invested in medium-format Hasselblad cameras for the Gemini program — arguably the best cameras out there. (The Picture Show : NPR, July 19, 2009)

Shedding Light On The Moon

In 1962, Mercury astronaut John Glenn bought a cheap 35mm camera at a Cocoa Beach, Fla., drug store, because he alone thought America’s first orbital spaceflight deserved to be documented with still images. Photographer Michael Light shares this bit of information in his project Full Moon. Over time, Light explains, NASA recognized the value of in-flight photography and invested in medium-format Hasselblad cameras for the Gemini program — arguably the best cameras out there. (The Picture Show : NPR, July 19, 2009)