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Live Cams from the Statue of Liberty
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Image description: Today is the Statue of Liberty’s 125th birthday. It was dedicated on October 28, 1886 and was a gift of friendship from the people of France to the people of the United States.
To celebrate 125 years, five live webcams from the Statue’s torch will be turned on and give the world access to an area of the Statue that has been closed since 1916. This photo was taken while the crew installed the new webcams.
Photo from the Statue of Liberty National Monument on Facebook

Live Cams from the Statue of Liberty

usagov:

Image description: Today is the Statue of Liberty’s 125th birthday. It was dedicated on October 28, 1886 and was a gift of friendship from the people of France to the people of the United States.

To celebrate 125 years, five live webcams from the Statue’s torch will be turned on and give the world access to an area of the Statue that has been closed since 1916. This photo was taken while the crew installed the new webcams.

Photo from the Statue of Liberty National Monument on Facebook

Happy 125th, Lady Liberty
All day yesterday people came to the city in droves to participate in to-day’s celebration. Extra heavily loaded trains, much behind schedule time, were the rule on every railroad entering the city. Every hotel was crowded to its utmost capacity last night, and there was hardly one of the better known hotels which did not have to turn away hundreds of would be guests. This may be taken as an indication of the great crowds which will come to town to-day, when the carrying capacity of all the roads will be taxed to their utmost if the weather promises to be at all pleasant. Frenchmen were probably the most numerous among yesterday’s arrivals, coming from all parts of the country and in great masses from the northern and western portions of this State, from Canada, and from the mills in Eastern Massachusetts and Connecticut. (NYT: Oct. 28, 1886: Liberty’s Great Statue)
kateoplis: The work in progress
'Give Me Your Tired…': How a Sonnet Made a Statue the ‘Mother of Exiles’
Photo: Visit to Statue of Liberty: 1940 | Shorpy Historical Photo Archive

Happy 125th, Lady Liberty

All day yesterday people came to the city in droves to participate in to-day’s celebration. Extra heavily loaded trains, much behind schedule time, were the rule on every railroad entering the city. Every hotel was crowded to its utmost capacity last night, and there was hardly one of the better known hotels which did not have to turn away hundreds of would be guests. This may be taken as an indication of the great crowds which will come to town to-day, when the carrying capacity of all the roads will be taxed to their utmost if the weather promises to be at all pleasant. Frenchmen were probably the most numerous among yesterday’s arrivals, coming from all parts of the country and in great masses from the northern and western portions of this State, from Canada, and from the mills in Eastern Massachusetts and Connecticut. (NYT: Oct. 28, 1886: Liberty’s Great Statue)

kateoplisThe work in progress

'Give Me Your Tired…': How a Sonnet Made a Statue the ‘Mother of Exiles’

Photo: Visit to Statue of Liberty: 1940 | Shorpy Historical Photo Archive

A lost view
9/11: The Week Before - Alan Taylor - In Focus - The Atlantic
I thought it would be interesting to go through the newswires and find photos of events taking place around the world during the week of September 3 to September 10, 2001. Some of the photos are directly related to the upcoming attacks, or the fallout that resulted, many have nothing at all to do with the attacks, but simply show glimpses of what was happening at that time. Gathered here is a time capsule of images taken during this week of September, one decade ago, before everything changed.
The Statue of Liberty in New York Harbor, as seen from the top of the World Trade Center South Tower on September 5, 2001. Original here. (Julien Menichini / CC BY)
9/11

A lost view

9/11: The Week Before - Alan Taylor - In Focus - The Atlantic

I thought it would be interesting to go through the newswires and find photos of events taking place around the world during the week of September 3 to September 10, 2001. Some of the photos are directly related to the upcoming attacks, or the fallout that resulted, many have nothing at all to do with the attacks, but simply show glimpses of what was happening at that time. Gathered here is a time capsule of images taken during this week of September, one decade ago, before everything changed.

The Statue of Liberty in New York Harbor, as seen from the top of the World Trade Center South Tower on September 5, 2001. Original here. (Julien Menichini / CC BY)

9/11

kateoplis

kateoplis:

David Plowden has documented America’s vanishing landscapes for five decades, describing himself as “an archeologist with a camera” who has spent his life “one step ahead of the wrecking ball.” 

“I have been beset, with a sense of urgency to record those parts of our heritage which seem to be receding as quickly as the view from the rear of a speeding train. I fear that we are eradicating the evidence of our past accomplishments so quickly that in time we may well lose the sense of who we are.”

Here’s a small sampler from his stunning online collection of nearly 2,000 prints:

1. Statue of Liberty from Caven Point Road, 1967

2. World Trade Center from Johnson Avenue, 1972

3. Yaquina Bay Bridge, 1968

4. Golden Valley, North Dakota, 1971 

5. Gotebo, Oklahoma, 1969

6. Erie-Lackawanna Railroad, westbound Phoebe Snow, 1964

abcworldnews
Give Us Your Tired, Your Poor, Your Comps

New York Times reports that U.S. Postal Service has unveiled a new Forever stamp, this time with the Statue of Liberty on it. Only problem? The photo is of the replica statue in Las Vegas, not the original in New York City. That’s a 14-year-old statue versus a 125-year-old statue for those keeping count. The post office admits it thought it had the more iconic NYC statue until a stamp collector proved otherwise.
The post office says it’s still very happy with the stamp and not changing it.
Best story of the day.   

Give Us Your Tired, Your Poor, Your Comps

New York Times reports that U.S. Postal Service has unveiled a new Forever stamp, this time with the Statue of Liberty on it. Only problem? The photo is of the replica statue in Las Vegas, not the original in New York City. That’s a 14-year-old statue versus a 125-year-old statue for those keeping count. The post office admits it thought it had the more iconic NYC statue until a stamp collector proved otherwise.

The post office says it’s still very happy with the stamp and not changing it.

Best story of the day.