Pearl Harbor Attack, 7 December 1941The forward magazines of USS Arizona (BB-39) explode after she was hit by a Japanese bomb, 7 December 1941. Frame clipped from a color motion picture taken from on board USS Solace (AH-5).
USS Arizona Casualty List
More: This Is Not Drill | And So It Begins | Days Before War
Official U.S. Navy Photograph, National Archives collection.

Pearl Harbor Attack, 7 December 1941

The forward magazines of USS Arizona (BB-39) explode after she was hit by a Japanese bomb, 7 December 1941. Frame clipped from a color motion picture taken from on board USS Solace (AH-5).

USS Arizona Casualty List

More: This Is Not Drill | And So It Begins | Days Before War

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, National Archives collection.

Days Before War
The December 8, 1941, edition of LIFE was printed in advance of Pearl Harbor but chillingly alluded to the looming conflict with Japan:
In his famous visit to FDR, the magazine said, Tokyo’s special envoy was told “frankly that Japan’s conquering course of empire had careened to its end, as far as the U.S. was concerned. Now a line was drawn, over which Japan cannot step without risk of war with the U.S….The stage was set for war, a distant, dangerous, hard, amphibious war for which the American nation was not yet fully prepared….”

Days Before War

The December 8, 1941, edition of LIFE was printed in advance of Pearl Harbor but chillingly alluded to the looming conflict with Japan:

In his famous visit to FDR, the magazine said, Tokyo’s special envoy was told “frankly that Japan’s conquering course of empire had careened to its end, as far as the U.S. was concerned. Now a line was drawn, over which Japan cannot step without risk of war with the U.S….The stage was set for war, a distant, dangerous, hard, amphibious war for which the American nation was not yet fully prepared….”

While waiting on the deck of his troop transport ship to load into a landing craft on the morning of D-Day Sergeant George Kobe, of Roanoke’s Company D, 116th Infantry, passed this dollar bill around gathering signatures from as many of his comrades as possible. At least six of the men who wrote their names (some are illegible) were killed later that day. Virginia National Guard Historical Collection

While waiting on the deck of his troop transport ship to load into a landing craft on the morning of D-Day Sergeant George Kobe, of Roanoke’s Company D, 116th Infantry, passed this dollar bill around gathering signatures from as many of his comrades as possible. At least six of the men who wrote their names (some are illegible) were killed later that day. Virginia National Guard Historical Collection

And you think your iPad is cool
V-mail is inspected for flaws on an enlarging “reader” at the Pentagon building, Washington, D.C. V-mail is available to and from the armed forces stationed outside the United States. It is only 1/65th the weight of ordinary mail and saves ninety-eight percent of the cargo space required for ordinary letters. 1,600 letters can be placed on a roll of film little larger than a pack of cigarettes. (1943, Library of Congress)
MORE: A history of V-mail from the National Postal Museum

And you think your iPad is cool

V-mail is inspected for flaws on an enlarging “reader” at the Pentagon building, Washington, D.C. V-mail is available to and from the armed forces stationed outside the United States. It is only 1/65th the weight of ordinary mail and saves ninety-eight percent of the cargo space required for ordinary letters. 1,600 letters can be placed on a roll of film little larger than a pack of cigarettes. (1943, Library of Congress)

MORE: A history of V-mail from the National Postal Museum