While waiting on the deck of his troop transport ship to load into a landing craft on the morning of D-Day Sergeant George Kobe, of Roanoke’s Company D, 116th Infantry, passed this dollar bill around gathering signatures from as many of his comrades as possible. At least six of the men who wrote their names (some are illegible) were killed later that day. Virginia National Guard Historical Collection

While waiting on the deck of his troop transport ship to load into a landing craft on the morning of D-Day Sergeant George Kobe, of Roanoke’s Company D, 116th Infantry, passed this dollar bill around gathering signatures from as many of his comrades as possible. At least six of the men who wrote their names (some are illegible) were killed later that day. Virginia National Guard Historical Collection

And you think your iPad is cool
V-mail is inspected for flaws on an enlarging “reader” at the Pentagon building, Washington, D.C. V-mail is available to and from the armed forces stationed outside the United States. It is only 1/65th the weight of ordinary mail and saves ninety-eight percent of the cargo space required for ordinary letters. 1,600 letters can be placed on a roll of film little larger than a pack of cigarettes. (1943, Library of Congress)
MORE: A history of V-mail from the National Postal Museum

And you think your iPad is cool

V-mail is inspected for flaws on an enlarging “reader” at the Pentagon building, Washington, D.C. V-mail is available to and from the armed forces stationed outside the United States. It is only 1/65th the weight of ordinary mail and saves ninety-eight percent of the cargo space required for ordinary letters. 1,600 letters can be placed on a roll of film little larger than a pack of cigarettes. (1943, Library of Congress)

MORE: A history of V-mail from the National Postal Museum